Inhoud 2015 nr. 3

Johan H. Winkelman, Ongeïdentificeerd (1) of Henric en Claredamye. Een Maaslands fragment uit het begin van de dertiende eeuw

Geert Warnar, Elckerlijc in beeld: Jan Provoosts ‘Rijkaard en de dood’ 

Toos Streng, Genre, sekse en gender. De historische roman in de negentiende eeuw

Katharina Hupe & Ralf Grüttemeier, Het Brugse proces tegen Camille Lemonniers L’homme en amour en zijn betekenis voor het Belgische literaire veld rond 1900

 

Boekbeoordelingen

Elsa Strietman over Jeroen Vandommele & Ruud Ryckaert (red.), Menich Constich Gheest. Het Antwerpse landjuweel van 1561 anders bekeken

Sophie Reinders over A. Agnes Sneller, De Gouden Eeuw in gedichten van Joost van den Vondel (1587-1679)

Kris Steyaert over Anne van Buul, In vreemde grond geworteld. Prerafaëlitisme in de Nederlandse literatuur en beeldende kunst (1855-1910)

Mary Kemperink over Herman Gorter, Geheime geliefden. Brieven aan Ada Prins en Jenne Clinge Doorenbos. Bezorgd door Lieneke Frerichs

Filip De Ceuster over Daan Boens, Frontpoëzie. Bezorgd door Els van Damme en Yves T’Sjoen; Cyriel Buysse, Oorlogsverhalen. Bezorgd door Els van Damme en Yves T’Sjoen;  E. de Nève, Muziek voorop

Mathijs Sanders over Dirk Van Hulle, Letterenlaboratorium – Hoe Raymond Brulez ‘De opstand der voetnota’s’ schreef

Janka Wagner over Els Andringa, Deutsche Exilliteratur im niederländisch-deutschen Beziehungsgeflecht. Eine Geschichte der Kommunikation und Rezeption 1933-2013

Lieselot De Taeye over Jan Lensen, De foute oorlog. Schuld en nederlaag in het Vlaamse proza over de Tweede Wereldoorlog

Linde De Potter over Jos Muijres & Esther Op de Beek (red.), Op de hielen. Opstellen over recente Nederlandse en Vlaamse literatuur

Alex Rutten over Menno Voskuil, Lagere aap. Het leven van Kees Lekkerkerker

 

Abstracts

Johan H. Winkelman, Ongeïdentificeerd (1) of Henric en Claredamye. Een Maaslands fragment uit het begin van de dertiende eeuw

Abstract - The Mosan epic (around 1200), in which the handsome love heroes Floyris, Aiol and Tristant play a part, survived only in small fragments. It is not a surprise, then, that the romances which are named after the fine-sounding names of the protagonists, have almost completely been forgotten. In the book ‘Vergeten Fragmenten’ we collected the remains of the three ruined texts. Still a tiny fragment which is entitled ‘Ongeïdentificeerd (1)’ (or, more precisely: ‘Henric en Claredamye’) is missing. This text is also considered to belong to the Mosan epic. In this article, the most important research results concerning this fragment are communicated. The question is whether the content of the fragment is pure fiction or whether historical details can be detected. Also the relatively frequent narratorial comments that bear witness to the rhetorical knowledge of the anonymous poet, are striking in this short text. The preserved part (v. 1-147) will be edited, translated and annotated.

 

Geert Warnar, Elckerlijc in beeld: Jan Provoosts ‘Rijkaard en de dood’ 

Abstract – This article argues that the painting ‘Death and the miser’ by the early sixteenth-century painter Jan Provoost (Bruges and Antwerp) shows familiarity with the Dutch morality play Elckerlijc. Looking at the shared historical context of both painting and play – the Antwerp communities of painters, printers and rhetoricians united in the guild of Saint Luke – the article attempts to clarify how this direct connection of late medieval text and image came about. As Provoost was a member of the guild of Saint Luke together with Govaert Bac and Willem Vorsterman, who both printed the Elckerlijc, we may assume the painter knew the text. It is further argued that these Antwerp circles of artists, artisans and poets can be considered a community with shared views, assumptions and interests, that form a context in which to study the interconnectedness of the late medieval visual arts and textual culture of the Low Countries.

 

Toos Streng, Genre, sekse en gender. De historische roman in de negentiende eeuw

AbstractThis paper examines whether and to what extent the concepts of sex (of the author) and gender (hierarchizing connotations of masculinity and femininity) are useful to describe the development of the historical novel in the Netherlands between 1790 and 1899. I discuss the prevailing view that low status jobs and feminization are mutually connected. It appears that, throughout the whole period, most historical novels were written by men. The supposed correlation does explain some developments, but only to a limited extent and time period: the trends between 1790 and 1875 where the total corpus of the novels translated from German are concerned. Remarkably, the weighted share of Dutch female writers was almost constant between 1835 and 1874, which can be explained by the status of Bosboom-Toussaint, who served as a role model for Dutch female novelists. The analysis based on birth cohorts of Dutch authors is a promising method for exploring the status of genres. After 1875, the correlation between status and gender proves to be true for a different aspect: the (supposed) public of the historical novel acquired feminine connotations. Finally, I assess whether female and male novelists of historical novels distinguish themselves by their choice of content matter and/or sex of the main character(s).

 

Katharina Hupe & Ralf Grüttemeier, Het Brugse proces tegen Camille Lemonniers L’homme en amour en zijn betekenis voor het Belgische literaire veld rond 1900

Abstract – In 1900, Camille Lemonnier, the ‘Maréchal des lettres Belges’, was brought before court due to explicit descriptions of the main character’s sexual adventures in his novel L’Homme en Amour. This was the last trial against a Belgian author initiated because of violation of morals regarding a literary work. This article analyses within a field-theoretical framework to what extent this trial indicates a new degree of exceptio artis of literature within Belgian jurisprudence. We argue that the specific argumentation of the defence before court, the public protests against the prosecution of Lemonnier and the passionate criticism in the press suggest a relatively high degree of institutional autonomy of literature in twentieth-century Belgium – at least according to the behaviour of the judicial, political and journalistic elite.